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My goals

Coupons make sales. Even if it means you make less profit, sometimes it’s worth it. Be good to your customers and they will be good to you.

I’m trying to step up my game and be more active in promoting my shop and what I can do. I want to grow and learn. My next goal is to get to 1 Sale per month in my Etsy Shop. To do it, I’m paying for promoted posts, listings, and an ad campaign to get people to notice my accounts. I also am going to more actively make sure potential customers get coupon codes for favoriting my listings or shop. I think being more active is the biggest thing.

Save 10.0% on select products from NETGEAR with promo code 10OFFPRO3PK, through 2/18 while supplies last.

I’m starting to work with Upwork again. I made a fair bit of money last year, but I let it slide when I found a day job I really like. That’s not a good excuse, so I’m back at it. I have a talent for logos and design. I should be leveraging every asset. I could make more if I “went it alone” to find clients, but that would require a lot of accounting and have zero protection. I’m willing to get paid a little less if it means I’m protected from non-paying clients and having to track down the money on my own. I don’t need that additional stress in my life right now.

Finally, I vow, once again, to post more often, more regularly here. It’s good for me, and I hope interesting to other entrepreneurs.

I hope all of you, my dear readers, are having a great early 2019!

Take it easy and remember to smile!

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50 Days of Logos – #dailylogochallenge

This post will be updated as I make more days.

Day 1: Rocketship

Day 2: Hot Air Balloon

Day 3: Panda

Day 4: Single Letter Logo

Day 5: Driverless Car Day 6: Coffee Shop

Day 7: Fashion Brand Wordmark

Day 8: Ski Mountain Logo

Day 9: Streaming Music Startup

Day 10: Flame Logo

Day 12: Airline

Day 13: Barber Shop

Day 14: Cloud Computing

Day 15: Hand Lettering

Day 16: Fox

Day 17: Geometric Logo

Day 18: Cupcake

Day 19: Kangaroo

Day 20: National Park

Day 21: Granola Company

Day 22: City Logo

Day 23: Boat

Day 24: Bicycle Shop

Day 25: Photographer Logo

Day 26: Paper Airplane

Day 27: Ice Cream Shop

Day 28: Hip Clothing Brand

Day 29: Rideshare Company

Day 30: Sneaker Company

Day 31: Lighthouse

Day 32: Sports Team

Day 33: Burger Joint

Day 34: Social Media Website

Day 35: Dinosaur Amusement Park

Day 36: Record Label

Day 37: Television News Network

Day 38: College or University

Day 39: Messaging App

Day 40: Camera App

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Medical AI in Communication

Here it is. This is my most recent creation in iterations. I was ranked only 2/5 stars for each design. I tried, and that’s good practice anyway. Why do you think none of them did well in the contest? How could I improve my design thinking? (shown in order of submission, and based on some feedback from the contest holder) The contest holder ultimately asked for a refund.

Background information

Name to incorporate in the logo

Scrybe

Slogan to incorporate in the logo

Unspecified

Description of the organization and its target audience

We need a logo design for a new New York based company called Scrybe. Scrybe develops a HIPAA compliant chat application for clinics, doctors offices, and hospitals to use. There are also plans to develop Artificial Intelligence based applications for doctors to use in the near future.

The messaging app allows an entire office, clinic, or hospital communicate with each other in a HIPAA compliant way. There is an iPhone App, Android App, Mac App, Windows App, and can be accessed on the browser. So the overall hope is that this takes over email and become the central communication platform for the office (almost like a Notification Center for the office).

The usefulness of the app comes from the fact that it’s all accessible (mobile, desktop, web) as well as super extensible. So after a couple of months we integrate it with the rest of the software that the office uses so that all the information they need can be accessed via the app (they should never have to leave).

Industry

Medical & Pharmaceutical

Visual style

Colors to explore

Other color requirements

Unspecified

Style Attributes

 Screen Shot 2017-10-30 at 1.43.51 PM

Design inspiration

Unspecified

References

Attachments

Other notes

The final design should have some elements of medical, communication, and technology.

I’ve also attached a couple of logos that I like for reference.

SCRYBE

vrk7bp commented on #3

8 days ago

Thanks Megan for the design! As I’ve been reviewing the designs, I’ve come to appreciate the ones that are slightly varied from the Slack symbol (bold S surround or in another design). I’m definitely leaning more towards logos that don’t have that same bold S “foundation”.

SCRYBE2

vrk7bp commented on #52

7 days ago

Thanks Megan, definitely like the current iteration better than the original.

Out of curiosity, if I were to eliminate the need for a chat bubble, or the chat aspect of the logo as a whole, would that inspire any other designs. More along the lines of Artificial Intelligence in chat, or technology in chat.

SCRYBE3SCRYBE4

 

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Eureka!

For my family and friends, it comes as no surprise that one of my sources of creative inspiration is Walt Disney. More specifically, the animation and otherwise artistry of the Studio and Parks is, in my opinion, some of the best work ever done, anywhere in the world. Glowing review right? I don’t work for Disney. 🙁 I’m just not that caliber. At least I’m not yet. 

Inspiration is a funny thing though. Where does copying end and new creation begin? If you trace over a drawing or picture at the start does that mean the end result, no matter how different, is nonetheless still a copy? I personally think the answer is no. I’m not talking about just changing a color or replicating the exact original in a different style (although that can be it’s own work of art, much more of a grey area legally and ethically). For my vector art, I often start with a photo and work it up into something new that sets it apart from a photo. Sometimes I combine photos to get a certain unfindable angle or unique pose. I hardly ever use all the details, and many times I end up running my lines through filters to get a certain type of line. Check out the example below. 


Believe it not, this Phoenix started life as a photo of a vulture. A lot of the work went into making the usually smooth feathers look more like flames. Picking and choosing where the gradients fall is a big part of this illustration too. There are both red and yellow lines to contrast the gradients and, of course, the head is entirely red to stand out from the brightly-hot chest area that I imagined would be the hottest. 

So is tracing really a cheat and a way of copying? When does a tracing of a vulture stop being a tracing of a vulture?

What about the question of collaboration on something like an animated movie? In the following YouTube clip, Walt Disney explains how sometimes and artist has to forgo their preferred style to mesh with other artists in the studio, but on their own they take the same tree and paint 4 very different pieces of art from it. This is why Walt Disney is my biggest inspiration. 

4 Artists, One Tree

Take it easy and remember to smile. 

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Credit Where Due

I had an epiphany today. I was working on a job at work and started doing corrections to make the result polished when I noticed that some of the details were rather ugly ok a logo. The designer had clearly used Image Trace in Illustrator. It wasn’t the worst I’ve ever seen, but I did a better job in less than 10 minutes. I think that extra 5-8 minutes I spent on it are the difference between good and great. 10 minutes is the equivalent of $0.16 under my own pay scale. The business is not losing money by taking the time to do the job right. Even if no one would have noticed the curves and bobbles of the Image Trace, you don’t want to give the the opportunity to either.

I guess all of the above depends on the complexity of the work to be done. Maybe I’d use Image Trace for a photo or complex logo and only fix the bare minimum if it was going to take, say, an hour, or $10, of my time. I have had to use Image Trace for a photo simply because the original wasn’t big enough for me to use. Usually, however, I make it look like it’s a bit pixelated anyway so it looks like a raster, what most people expect from a digital photo. 

I try to avoid Image Trace on the whole unless I’m looking to clean up or stylize something. For example, I have a drawing in pen or pencil. I want the lines to be black and crisp and the whites to be transparent. Image Trace is perfect for that! You can set it so that you only have black and white and then play with the threshold and minimum area size in order to clean up some lines or make sure some fainter ones are traced properly. It’s a good idea to expand an Image Trace before editing it. Expanding the result allows for editing individual points. I’ve also used the Path > Simplify option to further clean up needlessly complex results. It’s an art in itself. 

Take it easy and remember to smile. 

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deejay.photo


This design showcases the entertainment and event planning part of Ronnie’s business. The brief mentioned that the client wanted to see a design with foil in it, so I made my cards using the 877C Pantone swatch. Of course, the client could choose to have his cards foil stamped, which is more expensive. Either way, I included a mockup of the card so the client could see where the foil/metallic ink would go. The black area is what will be silver in the final design. The client also wanted the card to be two-sided so I put his contact information on the back. Since the logo was already a camera, I thought I’d stay away from photography related iconography. 

I chose to make this card tall instead of wide to emphasize the spotlight on the camera logo, which will be silver. It also affords the logo some much needed space. The client provided a logo, but I thought the lettering, especially the small lettering under the deejay.photo, would be too small when it came to print. I did a test print on my home printer and it bled fiercely. I know that professional printers would have much better detail in their prints, but why run the risk? I beefed up the typography while maintaining the weight proportions of the original.

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Good Clients

It’s no secret that the world of design is full of bad, naughty, impatient, mean…

2 days later

…awful, terrible clients. The nit-pickers want perfection, but refuse to negotiate payment when the project goes over budget due to time wasted on endless revisions. Vague-ists expect mind reading levels of understanding from a brief only 10 words long that says they want a logo.  Worst of all are the clients who give you detailed instructions on what they want, decide to completely change their mind half way through the design process, and finally at the end refuse to pay you anything because you were not able to finish the project in time.

We all know people like those described above as friends and family in addition to total strangers who want to pay for work they can’t do themselves, but don’t want to pay for work they can’t do themselves. Did I just confuse you, dear reader? Sorry. I guess you’ll have to take my word for it that’s its bad. 😉

But I want to talk about the good clients I’ve encountered in the last week. Two of them to be precise.

The first is, of course, the client who hired me for my first design job. Justin went above and beyond by telling me there was a problem with his payment and he had already fixed it. That job should clear with Upwork sometime this week and enter the mandatory 1 week security hold. It’s ok, just par for the course here in designer-land. I can’t withdraw the money until I have $100 in my Upwork account. That’s fine with me too if it avoids fees or ther pitfalls on Upwork’s side and keeps the service free to people like me (not counting the service fees since I set my own rate and the system charges the client the fee, not the designer.)

Good client number two is a repeat contest holder over on Freelancer.com. He held a contest back at the end of May which I won. It was only $25 after fees, but that was enough to set me up with a year’s paid intro membership on the site. I needed it! A week and a half ago the same client requested my entry on another, similar, contest. I read over the brief and decided it was something I could do for him so I submitted an entry. Yesterday, I received a message from him stating he decided not to use any of the submissions, but since he had solicited my entry he was awarding me with the prize. I gave him the files anyway since from my point of view it’s required to get paid and because if he’s paying then the work is his anyway. Maybe he will change his mind or use the illustration for something else. This was beyond my expectations! If you foster a good relationship with a client sometimes they will give you a break. The winnings will be $40 after fees. Again, not that much, but work is work and pay is pay. Repeat clients count for a lot and show that you do quality work at any price.

Two doves perch on the antlers of a deer skull
The winning design that starting it all

Take it easy and remember to smile!

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Persistance

persisto logo

Today – July 5, 2017 – I worked on a logo for a learn-to-code opportunity for kids. I had planned on working on this contest over the weekend, but just got around to it today with Independance Day disrupting my habits. In my email inbox sat a message from 99designs.com that one of the contests I watched had posted an announcement. The client, from a company called Persisto, stated that he/she thought their brief wasn’t as clear as they expected it should be, so they clarified, mentioning the use of graduation hats as a design elements. That made me think of a graduation hat in perspective, as in many illustrations. He/she also stated they didn’t want a letterform logo and we designers should focus on the tech aspect of their business. So…I had a graduation hat and the idea of technology and coding. The diamond shape of the hat matched HTML tags! While HTML isn’t exclusively what the business hopes to teach kids, it is considered a fundamental coding language for web and a precursor language to Javascript, one of the main programming languages for all web- and app-based programs.

Like the name Persisto, persistance and perserverance represent the core values of learning and success. I persist in submitting proposals and contests entries. How else can I learn? I know the fundamentals of design. Lynda.com provided me with a Logo Design class that was a great refresher for Illustrator in general. All that’s left is to continue designing. Practice makes perfect.

Take it easy, and remember to smile!